October 3, 2022

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The Ferrero Chocolate Factory discovered salmonella contamination in December

The Ferrero Chocolate Factory discovered salmonella contamination in December

Chocolate manufacturer Ferrero has already detected salmonella contamination on December 15 at its Arlon, Belgium site. According to a press release, it was placed on the refinery of tanks containing raw materials for chocolate products.

After this discovery, Ferrero decided not to supply the materials and chocolate products that were in the factory at that time. The filter containing the contamination has also been removed and control is “increased” on the end products, according to Ferrero.

But the Italian company does not answer the question of how dozens of people across Europe could have contracted salmonella after eating chocolate from the Belgian factory. Ferrero said the matter is still under investigation. The manufacturer is cooperating with Food and Commodity Authorities to conduct this investigation.

Also delivered in the Netherlands

Yesterday Ferrero out of precaution Various chocolate products are back, like the well-known Kinder surprises, due to more than a hundred reports of salmonella infection. These injuries may be related to chocolate from the Arlon factory, but this is still under investigation.

According to the European Health Service ECDC, there are a total of 134 reports, mostly young children, of being infected with the bacteria. The first report was on January 7 in the UK, less than a month after the bacteria were discovered in Arlon.

The Ferrero products in question were also delivered in the Netherlands. Therefore, the NVWA supervisor warns consumers not to take it. NVWA also ensures that products are removed from supermarket shelves. In the Netherlands, two children have been infected with the bacteria so far.

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