December 4, 2022

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A house with swastikas on Funda: this is how it can happen according to the broker

A house with swastikas on Funda: this is how it can happen according to the broker

But initially the “Nazi House”, as it was called soon after. Detached house with tattoo shop in Groningen Stadskanaal. A small piece of land there. Last Friday, everything was put up for sale on Funda for 319,000 euros.

As usual, the sales site can be viewed digitally to your heart’s content. And whoever actually scrolled through the pictures, could not ignore the Nazi symbols. On the wall above the dining table hung a huge golden eagle with a swastika between its legs, the party emblem of Adolf Hitler’s NSDAP.

swastika on bedside table

In the bedroom there was a flag with a swastika on the bedside table. Then there was the highly charged text “Jedem das Seine” above the door frame. Text hangs above the entrance to Buchenwald concentration camp during World War II and may not have been read on Funda before.

Location dump truck Post a great picture from the inside as well as on parra.nu Several pictures appeared. Al Shamal newspaper He wrote several articles on the “Nazi House”.

The house itself later disappeared from Funda and from the site of Makelaardij Boekelo, the office that wanted to sell the house. The mediator on Facebook offered “a sincere apology to everyone who was confronted with the pictures.” Explanation: “Due to human error, these images may be visible on the Internet.”

But how, that is the big question. Real estate agency owner Hermann Boekilo told RTL Nieuws today that the swastika was apparently noticed on the first visit to the house. “We confirmed it wasn’t really possible. The house would be empty.”

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Wrong photo folder

This was clearly not the case when the photographer came from an outside company, according to Boekelo earlier than intended, and “started taking pictures anyway.”

But didn’t you notice the swastika when the photos appeared in the mailbox at the real estate agency? “It sure is. So one of our employees put all the images that can’t really be done in a separate folder. But then he uploaded the wrong folder.”

Boiquillo sighs deeply when he says, “It’s a very disturbing combination of circumstances. I was absolutely shocked when I received a text message from a customer. We find this very disturbing.”

A conversation with Fonda

He says the house is no longer for sale with him. “We want to get away from him completely.”

Tomorrow there will be a chat with Funda about the whole situation and Van Buickle will hear if there are consequences for him from the whole incident. “There are brokers who think I should never be allowed to do business at Funda again. But these are the competitors who are enjoying it a bit too.”

“This is a story that comes out when you work in the world.” A woman answering the phone at a home photography company has already heard about the house with the swastika. The same goes for employees of the various real estate agencies that RTL Nieuws talks to.

The swastika is an extreme example, forbidden even to appear in public. But other observations that can complicate the sale of a home are not alien to real estate agents.

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Carola van der Krabben from House to Sell in Den Bosch is the real estate agent who was once nearly filled with the scent of 65 cats behind a front door. “The owners also realized that not every buyer liked cats and that there were an above average number of them. But they were very fond of these animals themselves. Hence it is hard to say that the whole house smelled of cat urine.”

Uncleaned

Ultimately, the house was not offered for sale. However, she once sold the house of a dead collector that was badly dirty. “Books, LPs, really everything, the upper floors were full of stuff completely.”

And it wasn’t the worst: “The occupant hasn’t been upstairs in years. It hasn’t been cleaned for a long time. The house hasn’t been maintained, the windows were rotten, the carpet was very dirty. The owner also had a big dog, who could go through a cat flap into the yard. back to let himself out.”

Very sad, Van der Krabben mentions such examples, especially of relatives who have to sell such a house. “They took twelve or thirteen containers of junk from the house.”

The solution here was to sell to an investor. “Someone fixes it and sells it again. It doesn’t feel like it. There’s no need to take pictures or show viewers around.”

brave customers

Van der Kraben never encountered swastikas. And the same goes for Mike DeSprung of MB McKillers of Breda. He laughs: “No, I think we have very good clients.”

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However, he sometimes has to talk about expressions of personal taste at home, which can make selling more difficult. “I came across a study room absolutely full of Pim Fortuyn’s pictures. I say about it, just like the selfies, they’d better take it off.”

He continues, “If that’s really someone’s superhero and those photos should stay at all costs, you’re not photographing that space at all.”

SM . vault

But no matter how prepared you are to sell a home, surprises can still emerge as you watch, De Sprong knows. “Daughter of the house who’s still in bed after a night out and suddenly falls under the duvet while on tour, I tested it out.”

De Sprong previously worked for a company that takes photos of homes for sale, for brochures and sales websites. “I once heard from a photographer that he’s suddenly in the basement of SM. You don’t take pictures of Fonda for some time.”