July 6, 2022

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Russian soldier to a Ukrainian widow: I ask your forgiveness

Russian soldier to a Ukrainian widow: I ask your forgiveness

“I know you cannot forgive me,” he said, “but nevertheless I ask for your forgiveness.” Yesterday, the widow, Katerina Shelipova, said that she felt sorry for the soldier, but she could not forgive him for this crime. Today, she testified in court regarding her husband’s death.

The man was cheating on their site

Yesterday, Shishimarin pleaded guilty to shooting the man. The tank commander told the judge what happened on February 28. He and other Russian soldiers were deserting from the Ukrainian army in the village of Chubahivka in the Sumy border region. We wanted to return to our unity and return to Russia.”

The Russians had stolen a car and encountered a man on a bicycle. It was alleged that the man threatened to betray their existence, so another soldier ordered a Shishimarin to shoot him. But this other soldier was not higher in rank, therefore, according to the prosecutor, the Shishimarin did not have to follow the order. The public prosecutor demanded life imprisonment.

11,000 crimes

Ukraine’s chief prosecutor, Irina Venediktova, said this week he was investigating more than 11,000 crimes committed by Russian soldiers. The trial of two Russian soldiers who allegedly fired missiles at civilian infrastructure in the Kharkov region will also begin today.

In the photos below you can see the shishimarin in the courtroom:

More things will follow

Many countries pay close attention to the case of Soldier Shishimarin, because this is the first time that Ukraine has shown how the country deals with detained war criminals.

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This is the first trial for many, says professor of international criminal law Sergey Vasiliev. “There are so many cases to come that I doubt we’ll remember his name in three months.”

Like this case, many others will also involve premeditated killing of civilians, predicts Martin Zwanenburg, a professor of military law. “But we will also witness the mistreatment of civilians and the failure to pass humanitarian aid, which will lead to the starvation of civilians,” he added.