August 8, 2022

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Hot weather in San Antonio

Coast to coast, the American heat wave threatens to tighten its grip

About 100 million Americans living from New York City to Las Vegas will see dangerous heat indices above 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 C) and be blanketed by heat warnings and advisories throughout the day, the National Weather Service said. NWS). He advised people to stay indoors, avoid strenuous activities and stay hydrated with plenty of fluids.

“Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outdoors. If possible, move vigorous activity to early morning or evening hours,” the advisory for Dallas, which is expected to reach a high of 112 degrees.

Temperatures are expected to break daily records across Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas on Wednesday, the agency said.

Air pollution poses another health risk during a heat wave. When power plants run at full capacity during extreme heat, pollution from the power grid doubles.

In New England, carbon dioxide production rose to 123 tons per hour shortly before 8 p.m. EDT on Tuesday. That’s more than double the previous hourly rate (4 a.m. EDT) of just 58 tons, according to estimates by ISO New England, the grid operator for the six-state region.

Texas grid operator ERCOT this week asked state environmental regulators to act at their discretion when power plants exceed pollution limits. The plants must operate at full capacity to handle the electricity demand recorded during the intense heat in the Texas grid region.

To relieve air-conditioned residents, New York City opened cooling centers in libraries, community centers and other city buildings and extended the hours of public swimming pools. Wednesday’s high was expected to reach 99 degrees in the nation’s most populous city.

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The extreme heat in the US comes on the heels of a heatwave in Europe this week that has fueled wildfires and set record temperatures. It’s a type of weather phenomenon that scientists say is becoming more frequent due to climate change.