September 22, 2021

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The whole Netherlands turns red on the map of the new Corona in Europe |  interior

The whole Netherlands turns red on the map of the new Corona in Europe | interior

Holland was totally red a month ago. The change is due to an increase in the percentage of positive tests. In the past two weeks, 4.4 percent of all tests performed revealed an infection. It was 3.5 percent last week.

Most counties have had between 75 and 200 positive tests per 100,000 residents in the past two weeks. If more than 4 percent of all tests are positive, counties will go from orange to red, even if the number of positive tests remains the same. If the Netherlands had stayed below the 4 percent limit, only Friesland and Overijssel would have turned from orange to red.

neighboring countries

The warning color is also higher in neighboring countries. Flanders goes from orange to red, just like the German state of Lower Saxony, which borders Groningen, Drenthe, and Overijssel. Other German states such as North Rhine-Westphalia, Bavaria and Berlin are still in the red. Wallonia also remains red.

Not much has changed in other countries. In Spain, for the first time in weeks, the area is neither red nor dark red. The northern region of Asturias dips from red to orange. The Italian region of Lazio, where Rome is located, goes from orange to red. On the Greek mainland, some areas turn dark red. Crete maintains this color.

Central Europe remains almost completely green. Countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary have the fewest positive tests.

To determine a country’s color code, ECDC looks at two aspects: the number of reported infections per 100,000 inhabitants in the past two weeks on the one hand and the percentage of positive tests on the other.

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A country always turns red if this first number is between 200 and 499 infections per 100,000 inhabitants. The percentage of positive tests is not important.

But in the Netherlands, this figure is just under 200, which puts our country in the category between 75 and 200 injuries per 100,000 inhabitants. It is usually “orange,” provided the percentage of positive tests is less than four. And our country does not meet that. According to the ECDC, the ratio is 4.47. In this case I still discolored red.