December 4, 2021

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Danish Scientists: "Every Breath You Take" is the ultimate regular song |  Abroad

Danish Scientists: “Every Breath You Take” is the ultimate regular song | Abroad

Which song fits every moment of the day? To the rhythm of morning, afternoon or evening? Is that why, according to scientists in Denmark, is the ultimate regular song?




While there is no arguing with the taste of music, as well as this research on it, there is music that most people consider enjoyable. After analyzing data from more than 150 million streaming sessions on Spotify, the answer to the question of which song is the ultimate medium: ‘every Breath You Take’ The police van.

different rhythms

Danish researchers from Aarhus University looked, among other things, at the different types of rhythms that people use during the day and tried to infer from this. What is the best music for her?. It turns out that in the morning people have a greater need for soft music, in the afternoon the songs become a little faster and louder and in the evening the music should be danceable.

A song that warms softly across all those beats and that fits a little bit into everything is every Breath You Take. According to lead researcher Ole Adrian Heigley, Everything about the song is average: the rhythm, great (but not too), has no unexpected moments and is a bit salty.

According to Hegley, this is good because it is useful for the ear at any time of the day. ,, Although the song doesn’t have heavy beats and maybe a little slow, you think the song for people who like to listen to music at night will not suit their taste. But somehow this song turned her greatest weakness into her greatest strength.”

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relentlessly popular

The Police hasn’t broken since it was released in 1983, and was a first in both the US and England for a long time. In addition, in 2019 it was announced that the song had been played more than 15 million times. To date, the song still appears on many charts, whether you hear it in the supermarket or as a hit. And now a cause has been found.

Using this data, the group of Danish researchers hopes to inspire bands to achieve high scores. Or should it be the same every Breath You Take? Hegley hints that that could also be bad.