The Astros selected Nehumar Ochoa Jr. in the 11th round of the 2023 MLB draft

The Astros selected Nehumar Ochoa Jr. in the 11th round of the 2023 MLB draft
The Astros selected Nehumar Ochoa Jr. in the 11th round of the 2023 MLB draft

\n “,” ProviderName “:” Twitter “,” ProviderUrl “:” https://twitter.com “,” type “:” oembed “,” width “,” width :550 “,” contentType “:” rich “}, { “__typename”: “Markdown”, “content”: “HOUSTON – James Turrubiartes will never forget the first time he laid eyes on Nehomar Ochoa Jr. The Galena Park High School baseball coach was in the press box watching a summer league game when a 13-year-old standing at 6-foot-2 walked through the door, Tropiarts said. I said, “Yes, sir,” and he said, “Okay, okay, I’m coming to the school next year, and I want to know more about the baseball program.” Needless to say, you know how I felt watching him walk through the door. \n \n• Project Central | Draft Tracker | Day One Analysis | Day Two Analysis | Day Three Analysis “,” type “:” text “}, {“__ typename “:” Markdown “,” content “:” Turrubiartes put Ochoa through court practice to decide which team to put him on – junior, junior varsity or varsity. It didn’t take long for me to decide he was going to be at varsity, where he played outfield and pitched for 685 on-base percentage, 11 home runs, 27 steals and 50 RBIs. On Tuesday, his hometown Astros selected him in the 11th round of the MLB draft. \n \n”Since “If they won the 2017 World Series, we just became a huge Astros fan, plus, we’re here in our hometown,” said Ochoa, who’s now 6-foot-4. “We fell in love with the team and \\[Jose\\] Altuve, which is a big part of Venezuelan society. \n\n • Astros take former star QB, Houston-area Matthews in the first round “,” type “:” text “} , {“__typename “:” OEmbed “,” HTML “:”

Nehomar Ochoa Jr. (NehomarOchoa) is a two-way Master Talent (feverish 📞 blocks more SP videos). Physical projects, strong and steady. 3B is reached and the potential of SP is shown.

FB: 91-94 mph
SL: 77 mph
CH: 76 mph

23 @employee RHP/UTIL@employee commit @employee pic.twitter.com/TIiZAr9Cqi

– Dustin McComas (@DustinLMcComas) July 27, 2022

\n \n”,” ProviderName “:” Twitter “,” ProviderUrl “:” https://twitter.com “,” type “:” oembed “,” width “:” 550 “,” contentType “:” rich “} {“__typename”: “Markdown”, “content”: “The Astros began scouting Ochoa Jr. Last summer, when he played in a few exhibition events, including a Texas Scouts Association game at Constellation Field in Sugar Land, home to Houston, “we were impressed with the physicality,” said Astros director of scouting Chris Gross. He’s up to 95 \\[mph\\] On the bump, but we put it as a hitter. He’s a run, he’s got a great arm on the field, he came to our practice \\[at Minute Maid Park\\] He showed tremendous strength and controlled the spring. The total package goes off the page, and we’re excited to keep another local boy here in Houston. “\n \n• Astros hired real student to game to open Day 2”, “type”: “text”}, {“__typename”: “Markdown”, “content”: “Ochoa, 17, born in Venezuela and came to United States when he was 10. His father, Nehumar Ochoa, was a pitcher who played parts of three seasons (2003-2005) in the Expos/Nationals system. His career was cut short when he fell off a horse and injured his shoulder. He now works for a tire company \n \n”Hopefully the extra money I’m getting from the Astros will get me the money to start \\[baseball\\] Ochoa Jr. said. “This could have been his dream.” “,” type “:” text “}, {” __typename “:” Image “,” caption “,”: null,” contextualCaption “,” contextualCaption “,” contextualAspectRatio “:” raw “,” credit “,” credit “,” contentType ” :null,”format”:”jpg”,”templateUrl”:”https://img.mlbstatic.com/mlb-images/image/upload/{formatInstructions}/mlb/fwebp8pjwyf5j0heqpca”,”type”: “image” }, {“__typename”: “Markdown”, “content”: “At first, life in the United States was not easy for Ochoa Jr. He said he was bullied at school when he was younger because he could not speak English. \n \n”But I’ve always been someone who doesn’t pay attention to any problems I have,” he said. “I’m trying to fix it as best I can. I basically learned English in one year. I started hanging out with Americans. I was taking notes. Every day I was learning three or four new words. I was forced into it because I was sick of people making fun of me.” For not learning English.\n \nBeing an immigrant growing up in Galena Park, a blue-collar community that sits along the Houston Ship Canal, brought other challenges, too.\n\nThe Ochoa family didn’t have enough money to send him to the elite summer tournaments, which made He limited his exposure to scouts.\n \n “Ever since I heard scouts tell me I needed to attend big events in order to be seen, I’ve been playing with a chip on my shoulder,” he said. , “type”: “text”}, {“__typename”: “Image”, “caption”: null, “ContextualCaption”: null, “ContextualAspectRatio”: null, “Credit”: null, “contentType”: null, “format”: “jpg”, “templateUrl”: “https://img.mlbstatic.com/mlb-images/image/upload/{formatInstructions}/mlb/fwebp8pjwyf5j0heqpca”, “type “:” image”}, { __typename “:” Markdown “,” content “:” Gabriel Rivera, who will be a senior for Galena Park next season, said Ochoa was the team’s leader and role model. He was the player the guys gathered around. \n\n For his age and size, I think he’s a good addition to what’s \\[general manager\\] Dana Brown needs in the Minor Leagues for the Astros, Rivera said. “I’d compare him to someone like Jorge Soler. He hits for power. He hits average too. He’s got speed, he’s agile, he’s got the power. Everything you need in a player, he’s got all the tools. \n \nOchoa Jr. plans to sign with the Astros and give up His commitment to the University of Houston. He said he will depart Saturday for the team’s compound in West Palm Beach, Florida, where he will undergo a physical before hitting the field.\n \n”That’s my main dream, just touching a big-league ballpark,” he said.’As a kid , I’ve always wanted to play in the big leagues, no matter what it takes.” , “type”: “text”}], “contentType”: “news”, “subHeadline”: null , “Summary “:” Houston – James Torrebiaartes will never forget the first time he laid eyes on Nehumar Ochoa Jr. The Galena Park High School baseball coach was in his press box watching a summer league game when he was a 13-year-old standing at 6-foot-2 and his massive dad walked through the door. \n “They asked if”, “tagline ({\”formatString\”:\”none\”}): null, “tags”:[{“__typename”:”InternalTag”,”slug”:”storytype-article”,”title”:”Article”,”type”:”article”},{“__typename”:”TaxonomyTag”,”slug”:”apple-news”,”title”:”Apple News”,”type”:”taxonomy”},{“__typename”:”ContributorTag”,”slug”:”brian-mctaggart”,”title”:”Brian McTaggart”,”type”:”contributor”},{“__typename”:”TaxonomyTag”,”slug”:”mlb-draft”,”title”:”MLB Draft”,”type”:”taxonomy”},{“__typename”:”TaxonomyTag”,”slug”:”mlb-top-prospects”,”title”:”MLB Top Prospects”,”type”:”taxonomy”},{“__typename”:”TeamTag”,”slug”:”teamid-117″,”title”:”Houston Astros”,”team”:{“__ref”:”Team:117″},”type”:”team”}]”type”: “story”, “thumbnail”: “https://img.mlbstatic.com/mlb-images/image/upload/{formatInstructions}/mlb/sladwjsw6gdxt6i8nxqo”, “title”: “select Astros Nehomar Ochoa Junior in Round 11 of the 2023 MLB Draft”}},”team:117″:{“__typename”:”Team”,”id”:117}}} window.adobeAnalytics=”reportSuiteId”: mlbglobal08, mlbcom08 , “linkInternalFilters”: “mlb”} window. globalState = {“tracking_title”: “Major League Baseball”, “lang”: “en”} window.appId = ” /* -> */

July 11, 2023

HOUSTON – James Torrebiaarts will never forget the first time he laid eyes on Nehumar Ochoa Jr. The Galena Park High School baseball coach was in his press box watching a summer league game when he was a 13-year-old standing 6-foot-2 and his massive dad walked through the door.

“They asked me if I was the head baseball coach at Galina Park,” Torobarts said. I said, “Yes, sir,” and he said, “Okay, okay, I’m coming to the school next year, and I want to know more about the baseball program.” Needless to say, you know how I felt seeing him walk through the door.”

Turrubiartes put Ochoa through a court workout to decide which team to put him on — junior, junior, or collegiate. It didn’t take long for me to decide he was going to be in college, where he played outfield and pitching for four years. 602 with a . 685 on-base percentage, 11 home runs, 27 steals and 50 RBIs. On Tuesday, his hometown Astros selected him in the 11th round of the MLB draft.

“Since they won the 2017 World Series, we’ve just become Astros fans, plus we’re here in their hometown,” said Ochoa, who is now 6-foot-4. “We fell in love with the team and [Jose] Touff, which is a big part of Venezuelan society.”

The Astros began scouting Ochoa Jr. Last summer, when he played in a few exhibition events, including a Texas Scouts Association game at Constellation Field at Sugar Land, home of Houston’s Triple-A affiliate, he batted.

“We were impressed with the physical capabilities,” said Chris Gross, the Astros’ director of scouting. “He’s up to 95 years old [mph] On the bump, but we put it as a hitter. He’s a runner, he’s got a great arm on the court, he’s come to our practice [at Minute Maid Park] He showed tremendous strength and controlled the spring. The whole package jumps off the page, and we’re excited to keep another local boy here in Houston.”

Ochoa, 17, was born in Venezuela and came to the United States when he was 10 years old. His father, Nehumar Ochoa, was a pitcher who played parts of three seasons (2003-2005) in the Expos/Nationals system. His career was cut short when he fell from a horse and injured his shoulder. He now works for a tire company.

“Hopefully, the extra money I get from the Astros will give me money to start a program [baseball] Ochoa Jr. said. “This could have been his dream.”

At first, life in the United States was not easy for Ochoa Jr.. He said he was bullied at school when he was younger because he could not speak English.

“But I’ve always been someone who doesn’t pay attention to any problems that come my way,” he said. “I’m trying to fix it as best I can. I basically learned English in one year. I started hanging out with Americans. I was taking notes. Every day I learned three or four new words. I was forced to because I was sick of people making fun of me for I didn’t learn English.”

Being an immigrant who grew up in Galena Park, the blue collar community that sits along the Houston Ship Canal brought other challenges as well. Ochoa’s family did not have enough money to send him to the elite summer leagues, which limited his exposure to scouts.

“Ever since I heard scouts tell me I needed to attend big events to be seen, I’ve been playing with a chip on my shoulder,” he said.

Gabriel Rivera, who will be a senior for Galena Park next season, said Ochoa has been the team’s leader and role model. He was the player around whom the men gathered.

“For his age and size, I think he’s a good addition to Ma [general manager] Dana Brown needs in the Minor Leagues for the Astros, Rivera said. “I’d compare him to someone like Jorge Soler. He hits for power. He hits average too. He’s got speed, he’s agile, he’s got power. Everything you need in a player, he’s got all the tools.”

Ochoa Jr. plans to to sign with the Astros and release his commitment to the University of Houston. He said he will depart Saturday for the team’s compound in West Palm Beach, Florida, where he will undergo a physical before hitting the field.

“That’s my main dream, just touching the big league field,” he said. “As a kid, I always wanted to play in the big leagues, no matter what it took.”

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