Crime Professor to Discuss Recently Published Novel

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Keramet Reiter, assistant professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California will visit Sam Houston State University as a guest speaker on Feb. 6 from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. in the Hazel B. Kerper courtroom inside the criminal justice center.

At the event, Reiter will discuss her recently published novel “23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement.” The book centers on the creation of solitary confinement in the U.S. prison system, along with the creation of one of the original “super max” prisons in the U.S.

The data received for the novel was from accounts of prison officials, officers, and prisoners themselves.

Reiter was first approached for this appearance during a conference in Texas.

“I met someone from Sam Houston and we were talking about the next time I would be back in Texas and that I should come to Sam Houston,” said Reiter.

This will be the first time for Reiter to visit the SHSU campus.

“I am very excited,” Reiter said. “As a criminologist, I have encountered faculty and students from Sam Houston, and I have heard of its many successful programs.”

The project that Reiter is currently working on is still in the writing field.

“I am working on a text book right now, so its way less exciting,” Reiter said. “But I am interested in a project about prison culture in Denmark and studying reform around solitary confinement in Washington State.”

For students who are interested in the prison system, particularly in solitary confinement, this is an event that may just be worth your time.

“I welcome students, I think it could be a fun opportunity to learn about different research methods,” Reiter said, “I will be answering tough questions that could have question how you think about actually designing a research project.”

The event is free and open to the public. For more information visit http://shsucj.blogspot.com/2017/01/237-pelican-bay-prison-and-rise-of-long.html